Fall Meetings

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Javascript Block

FALL MEETING 2015, AMSTERDAM

Working together, sharing experiences

SUMMARY

The Fall Meeting of 2015 took place from the 11th to the 13th of November in Amsterdam, the largest city in The Netherlands with just under one million inhabitants.

Working together, sharing experiences was the title of ASTP-Proton’s Fall Meeting. The theme was used before during the Fall Meeting in Prague and was perceived as a great success. It was an effort to share, integrate and work together, to co-create in a new meeting format together ‘with our members, for our members’ of the technology transfer community.

Some of the topics discussed were:

  • How to market our inventions and projects to industry
  • How to raise new funds for ideas
  • How to deal with software-spin offs
  • How to finance early drug development
  • How to work with difficult researchers,
  • How to manage conflicts of interest
  • How to make robust inter-institutional agreements
  • How to develop projects lean and mean

The topics of the programme that were discussed were for most of the participants, not new all. But all of the topics, or at least a part, are in our daily business. But the profession is progressing and only together can we and will we share experiences and best practices, and learn from each other, thus opening the opportunity to achieve more than each one of us could by themselves.

Apart from the Fall Meeting itself, there were additional useful activities for our members, which included two masterclasses, a NAAC meeting and other networking opportunities, such as the Knowledge Stock Exchange, the welcome reception, the European forum for TTO directors, the conference dinner and the ASTP-Proton morning run through the Vondelpark.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening remarks – Christian Stein
  • Welcome to Amsterdam – Jan Meiling

First parallel session

First parallel workshops

  • Managing collaborative research – Ruth Herzog
  • Making social sciences, humanities and arts (SSHA) impact visible – Christoph Köller
  • Venture funding: How to get funding from the EIF – Johan Reynaert Please login to download and Karen Laigaard

Second parallel session

Second parallel workshops

  • The many challenges of portfolio management – Jon Wulff Petersen
  • Researching researchers from social sciences, humanities and arts (SSHA) – Karlolien Steen
  • Opportunities and challenges in commercializing early pharmaceutical projects – Matthias Stein-Gerlach and Patrick Chaltin

Plenary session

Third parallel session

Third parallel workshops

  • Scrutinizing inter-institutional agreements – Heike Huisken
  • A lean approach: customers for breakfast and prototypes for landfill – Anders Haugland
  • Finding CEOs for your science-based spin-offs – Marta Catarino

Fourth parallel session

Fourth parallel workshops

  • From R&D dissemination to R&D communication: how to make ourselves understood? – Joseta Roca
  • Dealing with difficult researchers – Bram Wijlands
  • Managing conflicts of interest – 50 shades of grey – Paul Van Dun

Closing plenary

  • What do nerds really think about you?

FALL MEETING 2014, PRAGUE

Working together, sharing experiences

SUMMARY

On 12 – 14 November 2014 the fall meeting took place in Prague, Czech Republic, themed “Working together, sharing experiences”.

The sessions were focused on subjects such as:

  • The use and abuse of proof of concept funds
  • New developments in the European patent system
  • Educating university management
    The conference ended with a plenary about the innovating journey – an entrepreneurs story.

This fall meeting had a combination of presentations and workshops to enable discussions on relevant topics. We worked together on a best practice guide for spin off creation, on how to educate university management, funding opportunities for proof of concepts and spin offs.

Next to the programme on Thursday and Friday, ASTP-Proton organized 2 half-day parallel masterclasses on the Wednesday, followed by a one and half hour of guided tour around the city, a welcome reception at Karolinium, Univerzita Karlova v Praze and the European forum for knowledge transfer directors.

Prague is the capital and the largest city of the Czech Republic and has always been a political, cultural and economic centre of central Europe. The extensive historic centre of Prague has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites since 1992. Prague is a very popular tourist destination with about 4 million international visitors per year.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Welcome to Prague and opening remarks – Sara Matt-Leubner, Erik Vane, Tomás Zima Please login to download and Martin Buncek

First parallel session

First parallel workshops

  • The role of health charities in funding TT – Christian Stein and Susanne Schultz-Hector
  • Student entrepreneurship – Jolien Coenraets
  • Career development – Heather Thompson

Second parallel session

Second parallel workshops

  • Educating University Management – Karen Laigaard
  • Best practice guide for creating spin-offs – Karl Klingsheim
  • Managing conflict of interest – Anette Poulsen Miltoft

Plenary Session

Third parallel session

  • Generating value from Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) – Julie Sommerlund

Third parallel workshops

  • Managing your TTO efficiently – Amanda Zeffman
  • Separating winners from losers – Jon Wulff Petersen
  • Joint Ownership of IP – Making it work for you! – Tom Flanagan

Fourth parallel session

Fourth parallel workshops

  • Managing expectations to TTOs from our stakeholders – Ruth Herzog
  • PoC & spin-off funding – Anja Zimmermann Please login to download

Closing plenary

  • The innovation journey – an Entrepreneur’s story – Christian Stein

FALL CONFERENCE 2013, WARSAW

Success in KT/TT through collaboration

SUMMARY

The fall conference, themed “success in KT/TT through collaboration”, took place on 17 & 18 October in Warsaw, Poland. This was the first joint conference of ASTP and ProTon Europe.

The sessions were focused on subjects such as:

  • How to become ideal partners for industry
  • Patient related tech transfer
  • Working with students in the TTO
    The conference ended with a plenary about a general view from a senior Tech Transfer professional.

Several new additions to the programme to foster collaboration were offered, such as dedicating the third track specially for national networks, a Directors’ Forum Dinner on Wednesday evening and the Knowledge Stock Exchange (KSE) on Friday. The KSE parallel sessions allowed participants to determine their own agenda. You could take part in one-on-one meetings; share, discuss and find a solution to your problem with your fellow peers in initiative sharing; or hear about new products and services that might be useful for your KTO in the information corner. The conference offered enough networking opportunities for everyone at the fall conference, whether you are a beginner in technology transfer or a seasoned professional.

On the Wednesday, the National Association Advisory Committee (NAAC) was officially launched. The NAAC offers a perfect channel for dissemination of best practices and community building among national networks in Europe. All national networks were invited to the fall conference in Warsaw.

The conference was held at the Museum of the History of the Polish Jews. The Museum stands in what was once the heart of Jewish Warsaw – an area which the Nazis turned into the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II. This significant location, coupled with the Museum’s proximity to the Monument to the Ghetto Heroes, demanded extreme thoughtfulness on the part of building’s designers, who carefully crafted a structure that has become a symbol of the new face of Warsaw.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Welcome to Warsaw – Michal Olszewski
  • A peek inside the tech transfer operations of Stanford – Kirsten Leute

First parallel session

  • Track I: Equity management: getting and managing shares of spin-off companies – Mathieu Coutet and Rudi Cuyvers
  • Track II: How to become ideal partners for industry – Maria Tavares and Bo Stenhuus
  • Track III: Dos and Don’ts: challenges and opportunites in a national tech transfer network – what may or may not work and why? – David Secher, Carme Verdaguer, Regina Summer and Christophe Haunold

Second parallel session

  • Track I: Setting up a consultancy unit? – Karen Laigaard and David Secher
  • Track II: Strategic partnerships: who should be your partner and why? – Simon Gray and Günther Wellenzohn
  • Track III: Collaborating with industry: how can national networks support TTO’s in attracting and managing a collaboration with our most relevant stakeholders? – Maria Theresa Norn and Jean-Benoit Lhoest

Morning plenary

  • Setting an agenda for action – then getting the hell out of the office – Jeff Skinner

Third parallel session

  • Track I: Patient related tech transfer – Laura MacDonald and Florence Ghrenassia
  • Track II: Open lab: how to get more out of the collaboration of an academic lab joint by a products manufacturer? – Stéphane Delalande and Clement Goossens
  • Track III: Influencing decision making: what will be the role of national networks in lobbying and making things happen at a macro level – John Smith and Raffaele Buompane

Fourth parallel session

  • Track I: Working with students in creating spin-offs – Maria Jacobsen Lauvȧs
  • Track II: Working with students in the TTO – Marta Catarino
  • Track III: Sharing best practices with your researchers – Matthew Johnson and Peter Buchberger

Closing plenary

  • Summary session, general view from a senior TTO – Andy Sierakowski

FALL MEETING 2012, LYON

Business models in and for technology transfer

SUMMARY

The fall meeting took place on 25 & 26 October 2012 in Lyon, France, themed “Business models in and for technology transfer”. The key to a successful business model starts with understanding what the different types are and their key elements and which one works best for you.

The sessions were focused on subjects such as:

  • Commercialising know-how via consulting services?
  • Which methods/tools/services can be used to make the TT managers life easier
  • Experiences to be shared in and outside Europe
    The conference ended with a plenary on rethinking our own business model.

In addition to the traditional parallel session on Thursday and Friday, two parallel sessions were added on the Wednesday afternoon, the N3 meeting (Network of National Networks) and a workshop on Proof of Concept.

Lyon, France’s Capital of Lights, has been a centre of importance in trade and science since its origin dating back to the Gallo-Roman era. The second largest city of France is home to industries that have helped shape our modern world. From the silk industry, the mechanical engineering and car industries (construction of the 1st car by Marius Berliet), invention of the Cinema by the Lumière Brothers and today home to the many key chemical, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, Lyon continues to prosper and innovate. However, innovation cannot prosper without research.

Lyon, the most important French University site outside the Paris region, is also a centre for research in Europe with the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the Neuroscience Research Centre to name but a few research centres located in the region.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Anders Haugland
  • Welcome to Lyon – Michel Lussault
  • Financing technology transfer: the European roadmap – Patrick Terroir
  • Are living labs and/or FabLabs a new way to foster innovation? – Laurent Ricard & Emmanuelle Roux

First parallel session

  • Track I: How to design a licence agreement? – Ingrid Kelly
  • Track II: Commercialising know-how via consulting services? – Richard Jennings

Second parallel session

  • Track I: Examples of how to deal with future IP in collaboration agreements – Laura MacDonald and Mette Andrup
  • Track II: Business model innovation – Bjørn Alsterberg

Third parallel session

  • Track I: Which methods/tools/services can be used to make the TT mangers life easier? – Annegreeth Lameijer and Jackie Maguire
  • Track II: Succes rates of university spin-outs – Page Heller
  • TT impact on regional development: Spin out to create new jobs or licence out to local SMEs? – Wim Bens

Morning plenary

  • Results of the ASTP salary survey 2012 – Koen Verhoef
  • Expert panel discussion: How to recruit and keep high-quality staff in TTOs? How important is the remuneration level? Do bonus systems work? – Wim Bens, Richard Jennings and Christian Stein

Fourth parallel session

  • Track I: Best practices in technology transfer – Jeremy Philpott
  • Track II: Track II: Equity management is critical to success. Which model fits which situation? – Hannes De Wachter and Anja Zimmermann

Fifth parallel session

  • Track I: How to commercialize open source software or IT services? – Yann Dietrich and Laurent Kott
  • Track II: Experiences to be shared in and outside Europe – Ian Harvey and Takafumi Yamamoto

Closing plenary

  • Rethinking our own Business Model – Jeff Skinner

FALL MEETING 2011, ZAANDAM

Shaping the future of technology transfer in Europe

SUMMARY

This meeting was a combined fall and national networks meeting of ASTP that took place on 27 & 28 October in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

The theme of the conference was “Shaping the future of technology transfer in Europe”.

The conference had sessions on Thursday and Friday with subjects such as:

  • N3: maximizing networking in European Knowledge and Technology Transfer
  • Industry collaborations within the field of humanities and social sciences
  • R&D in collaboration with companies

The conference ended with a plenary discussion on how to give away IP for free in collaborations.

The national networks meeting was a follow up on that previous years initiative for national networks from across Europe. One of the goals for the initiative was to provide the different networks with an arena where they could exchange ideas and programmes and launch joint efforts that would ultimately benefit the growing TTO community across Europe. The other goals was to collect evidence on the important impact our profession had on the economy and society so far. The information was used to influence policy making in the future.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Anders Haugland

Thursday plenary

  • N3: Maximizing networking European Knowledge and Technology Transfer – Koen Verhoef
  • Licensing in the 21st Century – Kevin Cullen
  • A deal is done when a deal – the history of Sutent – Joern

Fridayplenary

  • Policy makers across Europe struggle with this question often. In this discussion we provide three examples – Christian Stein, Sylke Meyns and Anders Haugland
  • Industry collaborations within the field of humanities and social sciences – Paul Iske
  • Setting up proof of concept funds for academia. Different types of POC funds, what works for which field – Christian Stein
  • R&D in collaboration with companies – Phil Clare

Final session

  • The last lecture: a successful company founder tells his story – Anders Haugland

FALL SEMINAR 2009, KRAKOW

Challenges and opportunities in technology transfer

SUMMARY

On 29 & 30 October 2009 we organized the fall seminar in the beautiful and historical city of Krakow, Poland.

The fall seminar consisted of two days of intense plenaries, sessions, and discussions on important and pertinent knowledge and technology transfer topics. It was a unique opportunity to network with technology transfer experts from all over Europe, with a special focus on our host country Poland.

The theme for this fall seminar “Challenges and opportunities in technology transfer” reflects in many ways the location. Krakow combines tradition with modern development and challenges from the past have been turned into opportunities for the future.

As always we strived to build our programme around topics which can inspire and assist us in our daily lives as technology transfer professionals. Our three tracks dealt with technology transfer skills, partners in our daily business and evergreens in technology transfer where we have identified issues of particular interest to the community. The plenary sessions in the mornings covered more general aspects and the conference ended with a more informal panel discussion on “Screwing Up for Success”.

We attracted more than 25 international speakers with quite diverse backgrounds in academia, industry and technology transfer. We are extremely grateful to them for coming to Krakow and sharing their experiences with us.

A particular focus at this seminar was given to the “people” issue: how to build a personal network, how to manage the very entrepreneurial researcher who engages in many ventures, professionally and privately, finding the right people for spin-outs, and how to deal with difficult people. These sessions focused on aspects of technology transfer which are not always contained in university policies but which nevertheless represent an important part of our jobs.

Experts discussed patenting and IPR issues from different angles. The latest in the patent law was presented as well as issues surrounding enforcement of patent rights in case of infringement. Ways in which export regulations can put an end to the perfect commercialisation process were presented to us, perhaps not an issue that many of us think about very often. Furthermore, we discussed licensing issues from many angles such as project management, dirty little tricks in negotiations and how to extend the royalty streams beyond the usual patent term.

Our two keynote speakers, Piotr Moncarz, corporate vice president of Exponent and consulting professor at Stanford university together with Robert Marshall, former director of Cambridge Enterprise, brought

together the economic realities of company location and the more people-related (but not less complicated!) people issues.

The fall meeting programme itself combined with a unique opportunity to get a taster for Krakow’s richness in history, culture and technology development were a success.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Karen Laigaard
  • Welcome – Jan Kazior
  • Welcome – Jan Kazior

First parallel session

  • Track I: Information management / database – Laurence Blazianu and Laura Ruotsalainen
  • Track II: The “valley of death” – Chatherine Quinn and Jean Michel Gauthier
  • Track III: The other regulations – Bruno Lambrecht and Gert Demmink

Second parallel session

  • Track I: How to build and manage a personal network – Martin Hinoul
  • Track II: Finding management for start ups / spin offs – Francis DeBlauwe and Matti Airas
  • Track III: Latest developments in patent law – Eleni Kossonakou and David Parker

Third parallel session

  • Track I: Patents and more – Jeremy Philpott
  • Track II: “Privatising” tech transfer – Jens Damsgaard and Tom Hockaday
  • Track III: Enforcing your IP – Bernard Hertel and David Parker

Morning plenary

  • How to deal with difficult people – Robert Marshall

Fourth parallel session

  • Track I: Managing the technology life cycle as a project from disclosure to compliance – Lesley Millar and Alexandra Richardson
  • Track II: Private practice of scientists – Arne Astrup and Tom Hockaday
  • Track III: Extending the royal stream – Alexa von Uexkuell and Florian Beilhack

Fifth parallel session

  • Track I: Negotiating a license agreement – Robert MacWright
  • Track II: Working with trainees/students – Lesley Millar and Tor Aase Johannessen
  • Track III: Inspiring TT story – Alexandra Richardson and Andy Sieakowski

Closing plenary

  • Screwing up for success – Andy Sierakowski, Karen Laigaard and Robert MacWright

FALL SEMINAR 2008, VALENCIA

Mobilising partners in technology transfer

SUMMARY

On 30 & 31 October 2008 ASTP held its fall seminar in Valencia, Spain.

The theme was “Mobilising partners in technology transfer”. There was a track dedicated to certification and regulatory issues and an introductory track focusing on the licensing process.

A dedicated track covered the issues related to certification and regulatory issues not only found in drugs and medical device but also in food. Though most of us do not actively engage in this area, a basic understanding of the main aspects of these very important steps towards commercialization of research was becoming a pre-requisite for successful licensing strategies.

For those that were newer entrants to the field, or would like to fresh up some items, we provided an introductory track which focuses on the licensing process, an important topic for all of us. We are grateful to Karen Hersey and Morag MacDonald who brought an updated version of their acclaimed introductory track presented at our annual conference in Budapest in 2004.

Our speakers came from a diverse range of backgrounds, institutions and industries and we are enormously grateful to them all for their generosity in giving time and sharing knowledge with us all. The opening plenary speaker was the Former President of LES France, Frédéric Caillaud, who is an expert in licensing trends and was (at that time) leading a committee of IP experts in charge of the preparation of recommendations to the French Ministry of Industry in order to speed-up the development of a more efficient IP market. The speaker at the Friday morning plenary session was Karl Koster, Director of Corporate Relations of MIT. Karl has tremendous experience in dealing with companies interested in interacting with public research institutions and helped us understand what the key drivers are to establish and maintain long term partnerships.

Preceding the conference we offered an optional social programme on the Wednesday afternoon with a visit to the Polytechnic City of Innovation, and a guided tour through the city of Valencia.

Valencia, the third largest city of Spain, is well known for its long history, beautiful buildings and famous paella. Some of you also may know it for its more recent landmarks, like the City of Arts, all to underline the great effort the city nowadays takes in innovation. This dynamic and inspirational atmosphere contributed to an enjoyable and memorable meeting – leaving participants with fresh insights and new colleagues from across the European technology transfer community.

As usual, the fall seminar had a smaller setting than the annual conference. This helped to create an intimate atmosphere with a select audience. It also provided for ample time for interaction and networking.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Laurent Miéville
  • Welcome – Belen Justeg
  • Building a market for intellectual property – Frédéric Caillaud

First parallel session

  • Track I: General principles – Morag Macdonald and Karen Hersey
  • Track II: IP actions & showcases – Isabel von Korff and Antti Sinisalo
  • Track III: Drug development: realistic versus idealistic – Jean Marc Combette

Second parallel session

  • Track I: Moving research to commercialization through industry iollaboration – Karen Hersey & Morag Macdonald
  • Track II: Brokers / field experts – Guido von Scheffer and Jon Wulff Petersen
  • Track III: Drug development and regulatory affairs: free style or required figure? – Ulrich Granzer

Third parallel session

  • Track I: Pitfalls in Licensing – I – Karen Hersey and Morag Macdonald
  • Track II: Royalty monetization – Ken MacLeod, Phil L’Huillier and George Pickering
  • Track III: Food: from the farm (or the lab) to the fork – Gert-Jan Schaafsma and Filip Knudde

Morning plenary

  • What companies really value in their interaction with MIT – Karl Koster

Fourth parallel session

  • Track I: Pitfalls in licensing – II – Karen Hersey and Morag Macdonald
  • Track II: Web-based facilities (IP portals & exchanges) – Christophe Sevrain and Adrian Sigrist
  • Track III: Medical devices: regulatory – Corinne Lebourgeois

Fifth parallel session

  • Track I: Good management through enforceable royalty obligations – Karen Hersey and Morag Macdonald
  • Track II: Structural investors – Tony Raven and Charles Tavner
  • Track III: Medical devices: reimbursement – Corinne Lebourgeois

Closing plenary

  • The nine points – Karl Koster, Kevin Cullen, Jon Wulff Petersen and Tony Raven

FALL SEMINAR 2007, VENICE

Industry meets academia

SUMMARY

On 18 & 19 October 2007 ASTP organized the fall seminar in the Venice, Italy.

This former industrial area, famous for its trading and commercial activities over many centuries, was the ideal setting for the central theme of this fall seminar: “Industry meets Academia”.

During this fall seminar, ASTP aimed to stimulate a more broad-based, ‘intimate’ and open discussion between technology-intensive businesses and technology transfer managers. We set up three different tracks:

  • A track with sessions devoted to different industry segments
  • A track focused doing the transaction
  • An introductory track

We set up an entire track with five different sessions, each devoted exclusively to one industry segment:

  • medical technologies,
  • telecommunications,
  • healthcare and consumer products,
  • information technology,
  • and food industry.

A second track focused on the transaction itself. Here experts from both sides told about their experiences on how it is to actually do the transaction: from tracing down the inventions, over pricing the offering and finally negotiating the deal.

We also had an introductory track, for those that were new to the field or wanted to fresh up their knowledge. This track introduced us to the art and complexities of structuring and drafting collaboration agreements: experts from across Europe enlightened us on the essences of CDA’s & MTA’s, Research Agreements, Clinical Trials, etc.

Our speakers came from a diverse range of backgrounds, institutions and industries and we are enormously grateful to them all for their generosity in giving time and sharing knowledge with us all. For our plenary sessions, we welcomed two excellent speakers: Leo Roodhart from Shell International and Ron Botham from the University of Glasgow.

Additionally, we arranged a masterclass prior to the main event, designed to give us insight into the minds of early-stage venture capital investors. But for those who wish to start the event in a more relaxed way, we offered a full social programme to enable participants to mingle and exchange experiences and issues with old or new colleagues as well as with industry players in the wonderful atmosphere of the historic centre of Venice.

The seminar was organized in the mainland area of Venice at the VEGA Science and Technology Park, situated a short boat ride from the tourist heart of Venice.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Laurent Miéville
  • Using disruptive innovation to drive growth and change – Leo Roodhart
  • Welcome – Fabio Gava, Gianpietro Marchiori and Fabrizio Bettiol

First parallel session

  • The DNA of CDA’s & MTA’s – Mark Anderson and Allen Norris
  • Negotiating the deal – Herman Verrelst and Erwin Blomsma
  • Medical technologies – Uwe Schriek and Frank Bistervels

Second parallel session

  • Defining the relationship – Mark Anderson and Alan Payne
  • Pricing your offering – Kevin Cullen and Alan Lamont
  • Telecommunications – Keith Everard and François Jamet

Third parallel session

  • Common pitfalls – Mark Anderson and François Jamet
  • Tracking down inventions – Cecile Tharaud and Alan Payne
  • Healthcare/Consumer products – Alan Lamont and Petr Kotal

Morning plenary

  • The economic impact of TTO’s – aligning our business models – Ron Botham

Fourth parallel session

  • Standard agreements – Fool’s Gold? – Jeff Skinner, Ursula Haufe and Johan Schlüter
  • Joint ownership of IP – William Bird, Uwe Schriek and Kevin Cullen
  • Information technology – Michel Benard, Charles Irving and Darko Piscevic

Fifth parallel session

  • Clinical trial agreements – Riikka Roman and Franziska Weise
  • Case study on industry collaboration – Jan Delcour
  • Food and functional food industry – Fillip Arnaut and Ariane Andres

Closing plenary

  • How good relationships are built and maintained – Ron Botham, Kevin Cullen, Michel Benard and Alan Lamont

FALL SEMINAR 2006, NICE

Looking beyond traditional technology transfer

SUMMARY

On 19 & 20 October 2006 the fall seminar took place in Sophia Antipolis, just north of Nice.

The theme was “Looking Beyond Traditional Technology Transfer” – a curious title, especially given that so many of us were still trying to get to understand and implement ‘traditional’ technology transfer.

However, we believed the theme to be a good and timely one – since it was our observation that much of the technology that is transferred to industry did not follow the linear ‘invent-patent-market-license’ path. Rather it was taken up by industry partners in a more iterative way, often as a result of existing collaborations and joint ventures with businesses – sometimes even without the technology transfer manager being involved in the early stages. We should not work against these more complex mechanisms – rather recognise their power and work with them.

In addition to the topics mentioned above, the programme included:

  • An ‘introductory’ track for newer entrants to the field. This was structured as a hands-on interactive team exercise, based on a technology transfer case study that takes participants through the process of evaluation, strategy formation, marketing and licensing negotiation.

  • A track dealing with complex issues in technology transfer – drawing on cases provided and led by senior ASTP members.

We welcomed two plenary speakers – John Tyler, General Counsel at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation in the US, and Frederic Caillaud, Licensing and Business Development Manager at L’Oréal and President of LES France. We are grateful to LES France for having fielded a number of speakers at our conference.

In addition to the formal program we had a full social program designed to enable you to mix and exchange experiences and issues with each other.

The Sophia Antipolis region is renowned for its excellent science-based and density of technology-intensive businesses as well as its beautiful surroundings and climate and hence a perfect location for our fall seminar.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Jeff Skinner
  • Welcome – Jean-Pierre Mascarelli

First parallel session

  • Licensing: Preparing for the big deal (Case study I – Applications & Markets) – Jon Wulff Petersen
  • Use your researcher more actively – Søren Peter Olesen and Thomas Baaken
  • Inventors and ownership – Koen Verhoef and Alain Roman

Second parallel session

  • Licensing: preparing for the big deal (Case study II – Assessing technologies) – Jon Wulff Petersen
  • Licensing bits and pieces – Steven Potter and Jens Tampe
  • Applications and markets – Karen Laigaard and Damian Marron

Third parallel session

  • Licensing: preparing for the big deal (Case study III – Commercialisation strategy) – Jon Wulff Petersen
  • Collaboration-led licensing – Eli Keshavarz-Moore and Andre Clerix
  • Valuation & deal structure – Jean-Charles Guibert and Laurens Theunis

Morning plenary

  • Universities you can do business with – John Tyler

Fourth parallel session

  • Licensing: preparing for the big deal (Case study IV – Negotiation strategy) – Jon Wulff Petersen
  • Engaging in business oriented activities – Carsten Skamris and Gerardo Turcatti
  • Negotiation & closure – Simon Youlton and Jörn Erselius

Fifth parallel session

  • Licensing: preparing for the big deal (Case study V – Negotiating & closing the deal) – Jon Wulff Petersen
  • Market / problem driven innovation – Patrick Chaltin
  • Post deal management  – Chris De Jonghe and Chris de Bruyne

Closing plenary

  • TTO’s can work alone – Jeff Skinner

FALL SEMINAR 2005, ATHENS

Commercialising science-based intellectual property

SUMMARY

On 13 & 14 October 2005 the fall seminar took place in Athens, Greece.

The conference programme followed the now familiar pattern; a mixture of thought-provoking plenaries, presentations and discussions on issues that affect us all. Our speakers came from varied backgrounds in industry, finance and the technology transfer community. However, they were all seasoned practitioners – able to speak with authority born of many years of experience in the field.

We welcomed as our plenary speakers: John Bates from London Business School and Alex Brabers from GIMV.

The conference was split into three tracks:

  • The first track was educational in nature and was targeted at newer entrants to the field. For this seminar we focused on the ‘upstream’ part of our business – deciding when to patent, ensuring that IP is unencumbered and dealing with complex ownership issues.

  • The second track covered a range of issues and topics meant for more senior technology transfer managers, including sessions on Inventor reward, PR, and pipeline IP strategy.

  • The third track, entitled ‘new age spin-outs’, examined different ways of financing early stage ventures without relying on venture capital – our common experience being that venture capital is scarce, forcing us to find alternative ways of getting ventures off the ground.

As a community and profession we have a great deal to learn from each other – advice to seek, experience to share, deals to trumpet. We therefore built in ample time during the social programme, between sessions and over lunch to allow you to meet each other.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Welcome – Jeff Skinner
  • Welcome – Dimitros A. Kyriakidis
  • The role of venture capital in university spin offs – Alex Brabers

First parallel session

  • When to patent inventions and when not to – the art of triage – Penny Attridge
  • Structuring inventor rewards – Raphael Jung and Peter Raeymaekers
  • Bootstrapping new ventures – Kees Eijkel and Daan Bijl

Second parallel session

  • Managing the academic interface – Laurent Mieville and Anna Maria Nuutila
  • Building a reputation for innovation – Arvind Salwan
  • Managing technology development funds – Ágúst Ingthórsson and Adrian Ibrahim

Third parallel session

  • The importance of due diligence – Mark Anderson
  • Food and medical devices – Leif Kjaergaard and Terry Fetterhof
  • Business Angels – Tim Cook and Jaap Blaak

Morning plenary

  • Sniff-testing a venture – John Bates

Fourth parallel session

  • What are we doing here? – Tim Cook and Koenraad Debackere
  • License deals you shouldn’t do – Jeff Skinner and Mark Anderson
  • Corporate venture funds – Paul Morris and Anders Brännstörm

Fifth parallel session

  • Problem cases
  • Licensing case study – Randolph Noelle

Closing plenary

  • This house believes that Technology Transfer should be driven entirely by profit – Koenraad Debackere and Tim Cook

FALL SEMINAR 2004, LISBON

Creating business out of science

SUMMARY

On 14 & 15 October 2004 the fall seminar took place in Lisbon, Portugal.

In this hands-on seminar we focused on the businesses that arise out of scientific research. Not only the business development within or around universities, but also the ones that universities help to create together with or within industry.

The seminar focused on the business opportunities that can be created by drawing on a university’s – science ‘assets’, specifically:

  • technologies that can be licensed or commercialized via spin-outs, and
  • the expertise within academic research groups on which industry can draw through research collaboration and joint ventures

We invited a number of speakers from industry to tell us how it is from the ‘customer’ perspective.

For the third time in a row we offered an introductory course, this time on spin-outs. During five sessions we discussed a broad range of topics that TTOs (either those who have recently taken up the profession on tech transfer as well as the more experienced who would like to freshen up their knowledge) encounter when spinning out from universities. The course was delivered by experiencedpractitioners who illustrated the sessions with specific examples and from their mistakes as well as their successes

The seminar ended with a role play on the negotiation of equity, as TTO’s are often caught in the middle of this process, causing divisions between the university, the investors and the founding academics.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Jeff Skinner
  • Welcome – Fernando Ramôa Ribeiro
  • The technology transfer imperative & the role of the technology transfer profession – Al Berkeley

First parallel session

  • Introduction to spin-outs – Simon Barnes, Tim Barnes and Jeff Skinner
  • Research partnerships – models – Andrew Dearing and Peter Luke
  • Technology Transfer: Success criteria & organization – David Owen and Karen Laigaard

Second parallel session

  • Introduction to spin-outs-II – Simon Barnes and Tim Barnes
  • Research partnerships: agreements – Anna Maria Nuutila and Heinz Goddar
  • Technology Transfer: Gaps in seed financing – Laurent Braun, Patrick Sheehan and Al Barkeley

Third parallel session

  • Introduction to spin-outs- III – Simon Barnes and Tim Barnes
  • Research Partnerships: Clusters & networks – Philippe Mariani and Peter Reid
  • Technology transfer: inter institutional agreements – Johan Brants

Morning plenary

  • Can we – and should we- hope to emulate the US? – Patrick Sheehan

Fourth parallel session

  • Introduction to spin-outs-IV – José Salcedo, Simon Barnes & Tim Barnes
  • Technology transfer with specialist industries – I – Adele Long and Jan Chojecki
  • Technology transfer: EU competition law – Carlos Pinto Correia

Fifth parallel session

  • Introduction to spin-outs –V – Simon Barnes, Tim Barnes and Jeff Skinner
  • Technology transfer with specialist industries –II – Pierre Brisson and Michael Grufferty
  • Marketing technologies – Cath Whitaker and Amanda Lyne

Closing plenary

  • Equity Negotiation Role Play

FALL SEMINAR 2003, BOLOGNA

Science-based intellectual property management

SUMMARY

On 6 & 7 November in 2003, the fall seminar took place in Bologna, Italy, host of the oldest university of the world.

The programme was focused on science-based intellectual property management and included expert speakers from Europe and the US.

For the first time we also offered an introductory course on Intellectual Property and Patent Rights for those who just started their profession on the interface between science and industry.

Bologna is located in the Emilia-Romagna province, an excellent region for innovative start-ups, awarded as the ‘Region of Excellence’ in 2001 and renowned for its delicious Italian spices and tasty dishes.

The city offered the right ambience to share world class expertise on IPR between university and industry among speakers and participants.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Paul van Grevenstein
  • Welcome – Pier Ugo Calzolari
  • Integrating Science based IPR in an Industrial Technology Development Strategy – Jan de Wit

First parallel session

  • Introduction to intellectual property rights – Sue Scott and Todd Juneau
  • Capturing IP-A – Wiliam Bird
  • Capturing IP-B – Conny Bogentoft

Second parallel session

  • Introduction to patent rights part 1 – Sue Scott and Todd Juneau
  • Managing IP once it walks through the door – A – Alison Campbell and Antonio Maschio
  • Managing IP – Once it walks through the door – B – Peter Koefoed

Third parallel session

  • Introduction to patent rights part 2 – Sue Scott and Todd Juneau
  • Appraising technologies ensuring the strongest possible patent protection – Tim Barnes and Christian Kilger
  • The technology transfer death spiral and ways to recover before you crash – Robert S. MacWright

Morning plenary

  • Dirty little tricks in licensing – Robert S. MacWright

Fourthparallel session

  • Introduction to patent rights part 3 – Sue Scott and Todd Juneau
  • Adding Value to IP – A, Part 1 adding value through well-structured license agreements – Mark Anderson
  • Adding value to IP – B, part 1 business models – Larry Steranka

Fifth parallel session

  • Introduction to patent rights part 4 – Sue Scott and Todd Juneau
  • Adding Value to IP – A, part 2 to enforce or not to enforce – Remco de Ranitz
  • Adding value to IP – B, part 2 business models – Martin Raditsch and Vincent Rijckaert

Closing plenary

  • Building technology: a useful role for a TTO or a waste of time? – Alison Campbell

FALL SEMINAR 2002, ZURICH

Creating science-based start-ups

SUMMARY

On 10 & 11 October 2002 ASTP organized the fall seminar themed “Creating science-based start-ups” in Zurich, Switzerland.

A broad range of topics was discussed, from the very first identification to the growth and extension of start-ups.

The conference started with an overview of the management of start-up creation in more than 60 technology transfer office in Europe. The closing plenary of the conference was an interactive forum discussion where key-players shared their experiences and lessons learned from previous mistakes in “classic things that go wrong”. Each session was followed by interactive discussions with the experts.

The conference was attended by both technology transfer professionals as well as starters. All other involved parties (policy makers, investors, industrial partners, legal and financial advisors) were invited to benefit from this unique gathering of worldwide expertise in this specific discipline.

The seminar took place in the impressive main building of the prestigious Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), where many famous scientists have made their first steps towards international recognition and success. The northern part of Switzerland is known for its stimulating and supporting atmosphere for young entrepreneurs. It was this atmosphere that we wanted to share during the conference and social programme.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening and welcome

  • Three good practice models and their impact on the organisation of the tech transfer office – Paul van Grevenstein, Ulrich Suter and Bart Clarysse

Topics

  • From technology to business plan – Claudia Fesch
  • Pros and cons of different innovative financial instruments to bridge the innovation gap – Peter Jungen
  • Management: Profiles and Recruitment – Jaques Bouwens
  • Interested investors will conduct an in dept due diligence on the business plan, the management and the technology – Jason Rushton
  • Methodologies of valuation and approaches value of your business plan/technology – Agnus Livngstone

Topics

  • From business plan to start-up – David Owen
  • Shareholder agreement – Jeff Skinner and Teri Willey
  • Locating your start-up – Max Herzberg
  • Classic things that go wrong – Angus Livingstone, Jeff Skinner, Teri Willey and David Owen

FALL SEMINAR 2001, BARCELONA

Science-based patenting & licensing

SUMMARY

On 11 & 12 October 2001, ASTP organized a fall seminar on science-based patenting & licensing in Barcelona, Spain.

This year ASTP had chosen to explore in greater depth the complex subject of patenting and licensing within universities.

On the day before the conference there was a combined social programme, including a visit to an innovative incubator and a guided tour in Barcelona.

Patenting and licensing within universities had proven to be not only technically involved but raised many complex issues. As the ASTP Survey of 2001 had shown, the experiences and aims within European universities differed strongly. Therefore we decided to select contributions not only from universities but also from experienced patent attorneys and other law professionals. The programme brought news to tech transfer professionals who had just started their profession, as well as to professional with long-standing experience. At the end of the conference a role play helped reinforce what was discussed during the programme.

The conference was held at the Campus of the Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, an innovative and progressive institution just outside Barcelona. Next to this attractive location Barcelona was chosen for its warm atmosphere at the Ramblas and its famous cultural spots created by Gaudí, Dalí, Picasso and many other artists. Therefore a combined social programme at Wednesday afternoon was organized during which we visited an innovative Incubator followed by a Gaudí-tour. This inspiring surrounding created the right atmosphere to combine technical education and social interaction.


FALL SEMINAR 2000, LONDON

Financing science-based start-up companies

SUMMARY

ASTP organized a two-day fall conference on 14 & 15 December 2000 in London, United Kingdom.

The conference’s theme was “Financing science-based start-up companies”. It addressed all major aspects related with each stage of the start-up process. Unique to the conference was the fact that each of the topics was approached from two different angles: the technology providers and the venture capital investors.

In each session the viewpoint of an experienced technology provider was exposed to the viewpoint of a seasoned venture capital investors, and vice versa. This confrontation of ideas generated novel insights into the do’s and don’ts in the start-up process. Moreover, the sessions were highly interactive. Special sessions were organized to address specific, relevant questions from the audience and to discuss the most important issues, with widespread relevance.

The conference focused on the creation of high-tech start-ups in Europe, including the fields of life sciences, engineering and IT. Participants were professionals involved with the creation of start-ups in Europe, both young and experienced professionals from the investment community and tech transfer managers from universities and research institutes. The conference offered a unique crossroad for this blend of experts to meet and exchange ideas.

PRESENTATIONS

Topics

  • Why do universities/research institutes establish their own venture capital fund? – Dr. David Owen and Philippe Deville
  • Practices and pitfalls of finding outside investors – Dr. Jonathan Gee and Rob Zegelaar
  • Investment sources, methods of operation and exit strategies of growing companies – Jörn Aldag and Sam Williams

Morning plenary

  • A closer look at the rights and obligation of founders, technology providers and investors – Teri Willey and Dr. Jeremy Reffin
  • Approaches to determine the value of technology and business plan and the translation of the value in equity and/or license provisions – Laurent Kott and David Brister
  • The role of technology provider once the start-up has been founded – Ami Lowenstein and Dr. Raymond Whitaker