Annual Conferences

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ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2016, KOPENHAGEN

Making a difference through knowledge transfer

SUMMARY

The annual conference of 2016 took place from the 25th to the 27th of May in Kopenhagen, Denmark. The theme of this conference was “Making a difference through knowledge transfer”.

From the 25th to the 27th May, the meeting point for Knowledge Transfer professionals from all over Europe (and beyond) was the lovely city of Copenhagen, where ASTP-Proton’s Annual Conference took place.

The overall theme for this year’s event was “Making a difference through Knowledge Transfer”, with a lot of shared success stories, exchanged best practices, caught up on the latest trends and opportunities, and not less important, met and networked with our colleagues.

The programme was divided in 3 tracks:

  • Managing resources, where participants discussed methods and tools to support our offices and teams in making the best use of often limited resources;
  • Maximising impact, focused on how to measure, monitor and most of all increase the impact of our activities;
  • Mobilising with industry, provided a platform to exchange our experiences in collaborating with industrial partners, from SMEs to large companies, and not forgetting spin-offs.

The programme was aimed to address the expectations and interest of our diverse membership base, including sessions for both beginners in our profession and experienced practitioners, fields from life sciences to software and social sciences fields, and to explore both our core activities – such as licensing and supporting spin-offs -, and emerging trends – such as open innovation and design thinking.

As usual, networking opportunities were greatly enhanced through the Knowledge Stock Exchange, which has been a very successfully introduced in our recent events. Its 3 tracks, divided into 15-minute slots, allowed the participant to make its own agenda through mix-and- match of Face-to- Face meetings with other participants, short presentations of relevant service providers at the Information Corner and present or comment its own or colleagues’ interesting ideas at the Initiative Sharing.

The Programme also included the Director’s Forum dinner, a lively and informal event for experienced Directors of Knowledge Transfer Offices, and pre-conference Masterclasses on digital marketing, as well as a TT Primer for beginners in our profession.

The Network of National Associations of TT Offices also took this opportunity to hold their meeting, as an Advisory Committee at ASTP-Proton, and member-based working groups will also be meeting during the event.

We would like to thank participants, speakers, moderators, sponsors and everyone else who supported our Conference to be successful. We hope we have been able to create a stimulating environment for your discussion, sharing best practices, learning and that it has been a memorable experience to all of you.

We hope to see you again at the FALL MEETING 2016 in Stockholm in November!

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Christian Stein Please login to download
  • Welcome from the Danish National Network of Technology Transfer (DNNT) Insights of knowledge transfer in the Danish ecosystem and from a European Commission perspective – Søren Frandsen and Patrick McCutcheon Please login to download
  • Private-Public Partnerships – Food for thought – Henrik Jørgen Andersen Please login to download

  • What to expect during the Annual Conference

First parallel session

Second parallel session

  • Track I: Beyond indicators – peer review and benchmarking in tech transfer – Ashley Stevens Please login to download and Sara Matt-Leubner Please login to download
  • Track II: 3,2,1 and lift off – Venture funding 101 – Louis Berneman Please login to download and Søren Møller
  • Track III: Interdisciplinary collaboration between university and industry – Christoph Köller

Morning plenary

Third parallel session

Fourth parallel session

Closing plenary


ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2015, ISTANBUL

New horizons, new opportunities

SUMMARY

The annual conference of 2015 took place from the 20th to the 22nd of May in Istanbul, Turkey. The theme of this conference was “New horizons, new opportunities”.

The sessions were focused on subjects such as:

  • One size doesn’t fit all: how different environments require different TTO models
  • Providing innovation consultancy transnationally: what is it, why and how?
  • Cross-cultural awareness in global technology transfer
    The conference ended with a plenary titled: “What is it that you are doing? Essential questions on knowledge and technology transfer.”

On the Wednesday of the annual conference, a TT primer was held, which is a workshop that introduces the various aspects of tech transfer.

In parallel to this beginners workshop, there was the NAAC (National Association Advisory Committee) meeting, which was focused on the success (and failure) stories in running a successful national TT network with EU support. Two half-day parallel masterclasses were also given on this day.

During this year’s Bosphorus dinner cruise, participants could enjoy delicious food and the scenic tour of Bosphorus and beautiful Istanbul.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Opening – Christian Stein
  • Welcome from USIMP – Hamit Serbestand Cevahir Uzkurt

First parallel session

Second parallel session

Morning plenary

  • Technology transfer in Europe – Christian Stein

Third parallel session

Fourth parallel session

Closing plenary

  • What is it that you are doing? Essential questions on knowledge and technology transfer – Tatjana König

ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2014, Oslo

Exploiting resources, creating impact

SUMMARY

On 14, 15 & 16 May in 2014, the annual conference took place in Oslo, Norway, with the theme “Exploiting resources, creating impact”.

The sessions were focused on subjects such as:

  • Intellectual/knowledge resources
  • Why should we invest in your IP
  • Attracting big funds for our activities
    The conference ended with a plenary on how to implement, ‘social responsible licensing’ at your university.
This was the very first annual conference held by ASTP-Proton after the merger between ASTP and ProTon Europe. The conference explored ways of creating the biggest possible impact with available resources – intellectual, financial or human. We had sourced expert speakers within a variety of subject matters.

The Registered Technology Transfer Professionals (RTTPs) had a breakfast meeting where they could exchange experiences, learn how to receive their recognition most efficiently and meet with opinion leaders.

Oslo is the economic and governmental centre of Norway, a very modern city with a long maritime history. It is considered a global city and ranked “Beta World City” in studies performed by the Globalization and World Cities Study Group and Network. The home of the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony is also a pilot city of the Council of Europe and the European Commission intercultural cities programme. It is this European and global connection that makes Oslo the perfect match for this event for knowledge transfer professionals.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Profile, puzzle and priorities in the Norwegian science and innovation system – Anne Kjersti Fahlvik Please login to download

First parallel session

Second parallel session

Morning plenary

Third parallel session

Fourth parallel session

Closing plenary

  • How to implement ‘social responsible licensing’ at your university – Sara Matt-Leubner

ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013, VIENNA

Best practices in transfer of science and technology

SUMMARY

On 23 & 24 May 2013, ASTP organized the annual conference themed “Best practices in transfer of science and technology” in Vienna, Austria.

The sessions were focused on subjects such as:

  • Where are we standing? Sharing experiences from different types of TTOs
  • Hot topics in 2012/2013 – benchmark decisions, new initiatives in and around Technology Transfer
  • How strong is your IP on the market and in court?

The conference ended with two plenary sessions:

  • TTO globe trotter: Technology Transfer around the globe
  • Where are we standing – presentation of results
This year, we added a bit more operational content and interaction to the plenary session in order to foster discussion of the whole plenum. The successful conference add-on – the TT Primer – introduced last year was included again in the programme.

A special lunch session on Thursday about ‘how to be a Registered Technology Transfer Professional (RTTP)’ was held for all those who were already ‘Recognised’ and for those who wished to be.

Vienna owes much of its international fame to the many celebrated composers like Strauss, Mozart, Beethoven of Haydn, who lived and worked here. After being ranked the world’s most liveable metropolis, Vienna has also been included in the first global raking of “smart cities” with the world’s best innovation, technology and sustainability.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Vienna’s innovation landscape – Edeltraud Stiftinger
  • A moment of inspiration – Andreas Gall

Second plenary

Third plenary

First parallel session

Second parallel session

Morning plenary

  • The rise of Social Networks: LinkedIn – Neal Schaffer

Third parallel session

Fourth parallel session

  • Track I:
  • How to use horizon 2020 for TT activities – Marta Catarino
  • ENTENTE: an example of how the EU funding can support TT activities – Karine Baudin Please login to download
  • Track II:
  • Unusual Technology Transfer – Please login to download
  • Technology transfer in arts and humanities – Christopher Arnot
  • Track III: Open innovation: DOs and DON’Ts. Are universities and their Tech Transfer units open innovation losers? – Stefan Lindegaard

Closing plenary

  • TTO globe trotter: Technology transfer around the globe – Kevin Cullen
  • Where are we standing – presentation of results – Marc Le Gal

ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2012, BERLIN

Best practices in transfer of science and technology

SUMMARY

On 31 May & 1 June 2012, ASTP organized a conference on best practices and technology in Berlin, Germany.

On the day prior to the conference, the TT Primer was first introduced, which is a workshop for those new to technology transfer, followed by a guided walking tour around the city of Berlin and a welcome reception.

The sessions were focused on subjects such as:

  • Short term gain versus long term aim
  • ICT/Energy
  • Interactive sessions: DOs and DON’Ts in negotiations

The conference ended with a plenary about the number 1 success story of impact report 2012.

The programme featured three parallel tracks, introductory as well as interactive sessions. ASTP tried to find the right balance of interesting topics for newcomers as well as experienced professionals in tech transfer.

During this annual conference, a new session was added to the programme, called the Tech Transfer (TT) Primer, a workshop for those who just started in the TT/KT profession and would like to get a quality overview on exactly what it is all about, led by senior experts in TT/KT.

Berlin was chosen to host this conference because the city has transformed itself and has clearly emerged as a global location for knowledge and innovation. With a high density of universities and research institutions, Berlin was a natural choice for the tech transfer community to gather.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

  • Welcome to Berlin, the place for science, research and future industries – Anders Haugland
  • Introduction joint innovation strategy in the Berlin-Brandenburg region – Adolf M. Kopp Please login to download
  • Knowledge transfer into politics, society and economy – Reinhard Hüttl

First parallel session

Second parallel session

  • Track I: Outsourcing TTO activities? Yes or no or a little bit? – Jon Wulff Petersen Please login to download and Egenhard Link
  • Track II: How does the financial crisis influence our daily businesses in technology transfer? – Kai Uwe Bindseil Please login to download
  • Track III: Are we doing the right thing today and is it still the right thing for the next 10 years? – Konstantinos Kaloulis, Paul Uwe Thamsen, Theda Borde, Alfred Schillert Please login to download and Marc Le Gal

Industry/partnering session

Morning plenary

  • Update on ATTP & ASTP survey FY2010 – Kevin Cullen and Spela Stres
  • Social responsibility in/of technology transfer – Ashley Stevens

Third parallel session

  • Track I: Interactive sessions: do’s and don’ts in negotiations – Robert Marshall Please login to download
  • Track II: The knowledge economy and IP challenges – Ulf Petrusson and Andreas Gebhard
  • Track III: What is the impact of a good TTO? What makes a TTO successful? – Karl Klingsheim Please login to download and Kevin Cullen Please login to download

Fourth parallel session

Closing plenary

  • Introduction to the world of tech transfer and what’s it all about? – Kevin Cullen, Karen Laigaard and Paul Van Dun

ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2011, STOCKHOLM

Best practices in transfer of science and technology

SUMMARY

ASTP organized a two-day annual conference on 26 & 27 December 2011 in Stockholm, Sweden.
The conference’s theme was “Best practices in transfer of science and technology”.

The conference opened with the plenary session about ‘cleantech’ to help to understand how sustainable relationships could be contributed to sustainable technologies.

The other sessions were focused on subjects such as:

  • Let the professors market their IP
  • Health care
  • Starting up and getting out

The conference ended with a plenary discussion on how to give away IP for free in collaborations.

Sweden is also known as one of the few countries in the world where the “Professor’s Privilege” is still in use. We had therefore organised several very exciting sessions on IP ownership, the monopoly of TTOs and other slightly provocative topics.

Audience participation always makes these sessions more interesting and enjoyable and we are sure that many of you will have strong opinions on these topics.

Several sessions dealt with topics that may impact the future “workflow” in knowledge and technology transfer, such as patent funds, new VC models, IP in collaborations etc.

PRESENTATIONS

Opening plenary

First parallel session

  • Track I: When to patent and when not – Koen Verhoef & Nicka Kirstejn Please login to download
  • Track II: Let the professors market their IP – Lesa Mitchell & Kevin Cullen
  • Track III: Famous court cases – Lars Stig Møller & Andy Sierakowski Please login to download

Second parallel session

  • Track I: Health care – Shane Maloney & Martin Judge
  • Track II: Engineering – Fredrik Nordh Please login to download & Natscha Eckert
  • Track III: Systems, tools and training for a successful TTO – Jon Wulff Petersen

Third parallel session

  • Track III: Valuation and negotiating, part 1 – Ulrich Pessara & Anja Zimmermann Please login to download
  • [/checklist]

    Morning plenary

    • Update on ATTP and ASTP survey 2010 – Kevin Cullen
    • How to create an atmosphere for innovation – Christoph Wecht Please login to download

    Fourth parallel session

    Fifth parallel session

    Closing plenary

    • Give away IP for free in collaborations – Kevin Cullen & Henric Rhedin

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2010, PARIS

    The (new) role of TTO’s in the 21st century

    SUMMARY

    The 10th anniversary of the annual conference took place on 27 & 28 May in Paris, France, where the first conference also took place.

    The theme of the conference was “The (new) role of TTO’s in the 21st century”. The programme included diverse views on and expectations towards the present and the future of our technology transfer profession. The speakers presented their ideas as to how government, university and industry policies should be shaped to provide a framework and an infrastructure conducive to the commercialisation process.

    During this conference ASTP used a 3-track structure and made the third track an interactive session.

    The sessions were focused on topics such as:

    • Licensing & IP business models
    • Early stage development funding
    • Systems, tools and training for a successful TTO
    • Partnering with EU
    • Open innovation in the pharmaceutical industry
    • Building a TTO business plan

    The conference ended with a plenary discussion on how to manage a technology transfer office.

    The day before the conference started, 26 May, ASTP offered their participants to join a guided tour through Paris. On the Wednesday afternoon there was a welcome cocktail to have a first acquaintance with each other.

    As a part of ASTP’s 10th anniversary celebrations a tribute was given to individuals and companies who had made an extraordinary effort in the field of technology transfer. Favorite researchers, projects and companies were nominated for the following categories:

    • Best European researcher
    • Best European technology transfer project (TTO)
    • Best European company to do technology transfer with

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • Opening and welcome – Karen Laigaard and Ms. Kosciusko-Morizet

    First parallel session

    • Track I: The role of technology transfer in the 21st century knowledge economy: two models (US and Europe) – Karen Hersey Please login to download & Ulf Petrusson
    • Track II: Licensing & IP business models – David Owen Please login to download & Julian Nolan
    • Track III: The other regulations – Penny Attridge & Jeff Skinner

    Plenary

    Second parallel session

    Morning plenary

    Third parallel session

    Fourth parallel session

    Closing plenary


    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2009, GHENT

    Best practices in transfer of science and technology

    SUMMARY

    The ninth annual conference was held in Ghent, Belgium, on 28 & 29 May 2009.

    The theme was “Best practices in transfer of science and technology”. Behind this generic title we addressed three important issues underlying our work as KTT professionals, namely spinning out new start-ups, managing different expectations and raising to upcoming challenges.

    There were three tracks:

    • Dealing with various stakeholders
    • Upcoming challenges
    • Introduction to spinning out new start-ups

    One of the most interesting but also difficult tasks is to manage efficiently the expectations of our various stakeholders. To provide a better insight in how to best deal with the researchers, the heads of the institution, the local government and the industry we set up a specific track linked to these issues.

    A dedicated track also covered upcoming challenges such as commercialization in Arts and Humanities or the valuation of early stage technologies, among others. Instead of providing the unique solution (which does not exist), we aimed at providing the necessary examples and specific cases to efficiently address those challenges in your day to day practice.

    For those that were new to the field, or wanting the fresh up their knowledge, we provided an introductory track which focused on spinning out new start-ups, an important topic for all of us. Experts from across Europe enlightened us on the essences of spin-off creation. Going through the different steps of spin-offs creation, we benefitted from an insider’s views and advice on the details of the process.

    Our two keynote speakers, Sara Pearson, the driving force behind Cadbury open innovation philosophy, together with Prof. Koenraad Debackere, vice chancellor of the K.U. Leuven University, previous director of its technology transfer office and leading expert in the academic fields related to knowledge and technology Transfer enlightened us through inspiring talks.

    The final plenary of the conference was addressed to one of our now recurrent for/against debates. Is certification a good thing? Do we have to get certified? Will this add value to us as KTT professionals? Through a draw based gameplay, three leading KTT professionals started a lively discussion where the public had the last word with a vote.

    Preceding the conference we offered an optional social program with a boat trip and a guided tour. A welcome cocktail was organized to have a first acquaintance with each other on Wednesday evening. The traditional ASTP conference dinner was held in the impressive castle of the counts, Gravensteen, on Thursday evening.

    Ghent is one of the famous historical landmarks of Belgium, one of the first established industrial hub in Europe and birthplace of Charles Quint.

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • Opening – Laurent Miéville
    • Welcome – Sas de Rouveroij
    • Open innovation: silver bullet or business as usual? – Sarah Pearson Please login to download

    First parallel session

    Second parallel session

    Third parallel session

    • Track I: Deal structuring (1) Give me the money! – Brian Horsburgh
    • Track II: Working with industry – Mette Kirstine Agger Please login to download-PDFPlease login to download & Paul Depuydt
    • Track III: Commercialisation in the Arts & Humanities – Kirsten Refsing

    Morning plenary

    • The role of universities and research institutes in 21st century innovation ecosystems – Koenraad Debackere Please login to download

    Fourth parallel session

    Fifth parallel session

    Closing plenary

    • Debate on Certification: pro or contra? – Ashley Stevens, Jeff Skinner & Laurent Miéville

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2008, Bergen

    Best practices in transfer of science and technology

    SUMMARY

    The ninth annual conference was held in Bergen, Norway, on 29 & 30 May 2008.

    This conference looked in more detail at innovative ways to collaborate as seen from the perspective of leading practitioners in the field. In addition, we made sure to provide two tracks that resonated well with practice, be it on the junior level (introductory track) or on the more senior one (running the TTO).

    We welcomed Jan-Anders Månson, Vice-President Innovation and Technology Transfer, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and Bruno Van Pottelsberghe, Professor, ULB, ECARES, SBS & Former Chief Economist of the EPO, Belgium, for our plenary sessions.

    Prior to the main conference, we again offered the possibility to attend a masterclass aiming at bringing a deeper knowledge of the patenting process.

    Bergen was chosen as the location following the excellent feedback we received from the participants of our previous conference in Finland. We decided to organize again our annual conference in the beautiful spring lights of the northern part of Europe. Being in the vicinity of two UNESCO World Heritage sites (district of Bruggen and the the Nærøyfjord fjord), together with the enthusiastic and supporting local ASTP members, made our choice for Bergen a simple one.

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • Opening – Laurent Miéville
    • Word of welcome – Kare Rommetveit
    • The EPFL approach to Innovation and Tech- Transfer – Jan Anders Manson

    First parallel session

    Second parallel session

    Third parallel session

    Morning plenary

    Fourth parallel session

    Fifth parallel session

    Closing plenary

    • Are university TTO’s obstructive bureaucracies? – Bruno Van Pottelsberghe, Lou Berneman, Gábor Lamm & Malcolm Skingle

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2007, Heidelberg

    Best practices in transfer of science and technology

    SUMMARY

    On 31 May & 1 June 2007 ASTP organized the eighth annual conference in Heidelberg, Germany.

    The role of the technology transfer manager is broadening. Increasingly universities are being seen as engines for regional and national economic growth. To be sure, we have to run technology transfer professionally and be experts in early stage technology commercialisation. However, at the same time we increasingly need to balance direct financial return to the university with the wider – and potentially far greater – benefits (profits, employment, innovation) made by existing businesses in our regions. This is a difficult balancing act – the more so given the expectations that there are on us to generate income.

    This conference examined these issues along with many other current issues and balancing acts faced by us all in our roles as technology transfer managers.

    We had invited a large and diverse group of speakers who helped us all explore and debate the different issues. All spoke from experience – we only invited those who are practitioners able to talk with authority and experience about a topic. The first ‘track’ of the conference took a different format for this conference – structured as panel discussions based on topics suggested by our German colleagues.

    The plenary speakers were: Hans Wigzell, from the Karolinska Institute who talked about Karolinska’s own technology transfer strategy (remarkable for the strategy itself and for the fact that – unlike so many Institutions – they have one at all!) and Sachi Hatanenaka a long-time observer and researcher of knowledge transfer who advised universities and governments worldwide on KT thinking and strategy. Additionally, Pat Jones, President of our sister organisation in the US (AUTM) joined us for our closing debate.

    The conference was comprised of three, separately themed, parallel sessions from which you could choose:

    • The first track was structured as a series of panel sessions where a group of experts gave their various perspectives on a particular topic of current interest/concern. Panel members gave an opening ‘ice-breaker’ and then entered into a moderated discussion with the audience as we attempted to tease out the main issues and understand others’ perspectives.

    • The second track focused on the management of technology transfer projects – addressing such issues as project selection, software business models and landscape for new ‘cleantech’ technologies – a small but hopefully resonant selection of topics that will help you manage and add value to your portfolio.

    • The third track focused on structural and policy issues relating to the management of technology transfer – issues that we need to be more aware of as our profession grows and evolves into more complex organisational forms and interdependencies.

    In addition to the formal programme the conference was also deliberately social. We built in ample time for networking and devised a social programme to encourage interaction.

    The location chosen, Heidelberg, is known for its scenic beauty, architectural and cultural monuments, outstanding cuisine and excellent vintages.

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • The secret behind the technology transfer success of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm – Hans Wigzell

    First parallel session

    • Track I: Collaborating with Corporates – Christian Stein, René Rohrbeck, Klaus Wilgenbus & Gabriel Clerc
    • Track II: Increasing the odds in Tech Transfer – Herbert Reutimann & Rudy Dekeyser
    • Track III: Program dedicated TT units – Bruno Lambrecht & Denis Dambois

    Second parallel session

    • Track I: When we can’t find licensees – Egenhard Link, Patrick Jones, Thomas Wehlage & Rudy Dekeyser
    • Track II: Commercialisation plan – Robert MacWright & Karen Laigaard
    • Track III: Ownership & incentive regimes – Hans Wigzell & Teri Willey

    Third parallel session

    • Track I: Tech Transfer at a distance – Alfred Schillert, Martin Raditsch & Hannes Lehmann
    • Track II: Software applications and innovations – David Harnett & Jari J. Rantala
    • Track III: Regional networks – Peter Reid & Gabriel Clerc

    Morning plenary

    • Cultural differences between the US, Japan & Europe – what can we learn from the different approaches and environments –  and what are the implications for government finding of our activities? – Sachi Hatakenaka

    Fourth parallel session

    • Track I: Universities regenerating regions – Regina Oertel, Jean Severijns, Horst Domdey & Peter Reid
    • Track II: Seven Deadly Sins – Patrick Jones & Robert MacWright
    • Track III:Key Performance indicators – Teri Willey & Patrick Llenera

    Fifth parallel session

    • Track I: The use and abuse of early-stage funds – Alex von Frankenberg, Simon Barnes, Herbert Reutimann & Thomas Doppelberger
    • Track II: Green technologies – Jochen Moesslein & Antti Pasanen
    • Track III: Case study – the licensing of the MP3 technology – Helmut Schubert & Martin Sieler

    Closing plenary

    • This house believes that technology transfer is a transient profession – Jeff Skinner & Patrick Jones

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2006, Turku

    Best practices in transfer of science and technology

    SUMMARY

    On 1 & 2 June 2006 ASTP organized the annual conference in Turku, Finland.

    In the changing technology transfer environment, we noticed we needed to keep up to speed – drawing on each other’s experience of what works (and what doesn’t) and learning about new and unusual initiatives and programmes. This is what the 2006 conference was about.

    We invited a wide range of speakers from leading technology transfer offices, technology-based businesses and professional services firms who can speak with authority from their perspective as leading practitioners in the field. We welcomed Richard Jefferson, Chairman and CEO of CAMBIA, for our opening plenary to talk on ‘open source’ Biotech.

    Turku, the former capital of Finland, is situated in the heart of the Archipelago, the beautiful south-west region of the country. Though it was not as easy to get to as many of our past venues, we chose Turku because of the enthusiasm and help of our members there, the beauty of the region (and therefore a spectacular social programme), but most of all the fact that Turku is at the center of a high technology cluster.

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • Opening – Jeff Skinner
    • Welcome – Kyösti Jääskeläinen
    • “Open source” Biotech – Richard Jefferson

    First parallel session

    • Introduction Course: Patent Strategy – Jon Wulff Petersen
    • The role of Tekes in the Finnish innovation system – Jari Romanainen
    • Industrial Experiences from the Finnish system – Lauri Kangas
    • Panel discussion – Markku Sjöstedt
    • The researcher’s point of view – Jyrki Heino
    • Bridging in the gap between academic research and industry demands – Martin Raditsch & Konstantin Joanidopoulos

    Second parallel session

    • Does industry differ – a business perspective patenting – Arja Weckman
    • Looking at TTO: Financing your TTO operation – Jonathan Page & Bernhard Arnolds
    • Connecting to industry: the strong link – Petri Kalliokoski & Anssi Rantasalo

    Third parallel session

    • Experiences before and after a major deal making – Suni á Dalbø
    • Looking at TTO: Research on TTO – Bronwyn H. Hall & Dominique Foray
    • Connecting to Industry: Open innovation – a sharing model – Leonard Fass & Patrick Nef

    Morning plenary

    • A new innovative & interactive platform for ASTP members – Laurent Mieville
    • “Working the room” – Sue Tonks

    Fourth parallel session

    • Choosing and using your Patent Agent – Catherine Mallalieu
    • Looking at TTO: How to get better entrepreneurs? – Vasilis Theoharakis & Ioannis Arabatzis
    • Connecting to industry: A success story in techtransfer – Steef Blok & Tol Trimborn

    Fifth parallel session

    • Getting the maximum ‘bang-per-bruck’ – Catherine Mallalieu
    • Looking at TTO: Educating Faculty on Technology Transfer – Jeff Cope & Taina Saksa
    • Connecting to Industry: Via Venture capital to a trade sale – Patrick Nef & Simon Crossley

    Closing plenary

    • Third world protection as a TTO strategy – Richard Jefferson & Claire T. Driscoll

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2005, Amsterdam

    Best practices in transfer of science and technology

    SUMMARY

    On 26 & 27 May 2005 ASTP organized the annual conference in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

    The conference programme followed a familiar pattern: a mixture of thought-provoking plenaries and practitioner-led parallel sessions discussing and dealing with issues that affect us all in our ever-evolving roles in technology transfer.

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • Innovation in Europe – Janez Potočnik
    • How does industry innovate? – the role of the science base/R&D in industry innovation – Erkki Ormala

    First parallel session

    • Marketing Technologies I – Jeff Skinner
    • Exploiting Expertise – Jean Pierre Saintouil & Julie Grady
    • Exploiting technology – Francois Thomas & Jens Damsgaard

    Second parallel session

    • Marketing Technologies II – Chris Purdon
    • Exploiting Expertise – Barend Mons & Joaquim Menezes
    • Exploiting Technology – Karen Hersey

    Third parallel session

    • Marketing Technologies III – Ian Hardie
    • Exploiting Expertise – Paul Docx & Lars Landberg
    • Exploiting Technology – Jonathan Levie & Jeppe R. Jessen

    Morning plenary

    • Understanding cultural differences during a negotiation – Richard D. Lewis

    Fourth parallel session

    • Marketing Technologies IV – Louis Berneman
    • Exploiting Expertise – David Chapman & Martin Raditsch
    • Exploiting Technology – Christopher D. McKinney & Martin Hardens

    Fifth parallel session

    • Marketing Technologies V – Robert McWright
    • Exploiting Expertise – Sverre Horntvedt & André Choulika
    • Exploiting Technology – Dinko Valerio

    Closing plenary

    • Debate – the power of networking

    We welcomed as our plenary speakers Janez Potocnik, EU Commissioner Science and Research, and Erkki Ormala, Vice President Technology Policy NOKIA.

    The remainder of the conference was split into three themes:

    • The first track was educational in nature and aimed at newer entrants to the profession – this time we focused on the marketing of technology.

    • The second track focused on our emergent role in Business Development for the wider range of expertise in our institutions – principally through the mechanisms of collaborative research and consultancy.

    • The third track focused on specific issues in Technology Transfer. The topics we had chosen were all ones that members had highlighted as being issues of particular concern at the present time.

    All sessions were led by experienced practitioners from Europe and the US.

    We realized that members value our conferences as much for the chance to meet each other as to attend the sessions, so we had planned a full social programme and loads of time between sessions for informal networking.

    Additionally, the conference was followed by the first ASTP-AUTM summit. This one-day event was run in collaboration with the US-based Association of University Technology Managers.

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2004, Budapest

    Best practices in transfer of science and technology

    SUMMARY

    On 27 & 28 May 2004 the annual conference took place in Budapest, Hungary.

    The programme included speakers from Europe and the USA discussing best practices in transfer of science and technology.

    This conference the speakers enlightened us with their knowledge and experiences on licensing, current models of technology transfer, conflict of interest and a variety of aspects related to spinning out companies from scientific institutions.

    For those who just started their profession on the interface between science and industry but also the more experienced technology transfer professionals who wanted to freshen up their knowledge, we offered an Introduction course on Licensing.

    Budapest is located on both sides of the beautiful Danube and famous for its agreeable Fin du Siècle atmosphere, thermal baths and Art Nouveau buildings and decorations. As one of the states that enters the European Union in 2004, Hungary stepped into a new phase that doubtlessly will have its impact on innovation and the collaboration on science and technology with other countries.

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • Nanotechnology: the next big opportunity for major (and lucrative) licensing and spin-out deals? – Paul Atherthon

    First parallel session

    • Introdution to licensing – Karen Hersey
    • Licensing-I – Esteban Pombo-Villar
    • Start-ups I – Eleanor Taylor

    Second parallel session

    • Introdution to licensing II – Karen Hersey
    • Licensing II – Robert Yu
    • Start-ups II – Sheila Svoba Nori

    Third parallel session

    • Introdution to licensing III – Karen Hersey
    • Tech Transfer Models I – Kees Eijkel
    • Start-ups III – Angus Livingstone

    Morning plenary

    • Capital Markets, Capital liquidity, late stage financing and their impact on your start-ups – Herman Daems

    Fourth parallel session

    • Introduction to Licensing IV – Karen Hersey, Morag MacDonald & Mark Anderson
    • Tech Transfer Models II – Max Herzberg & Francoise Moisand
    • Start-ups IV – Angus Livingstone & Brian Graves

    Fifth parallel session

    • Introduction to Licensing V – Karen Hersey, Morag MacDonald & Mark Anderson
    • Conflict of Interest V – Jeff Skinner
    • Start-ups V – Mikael Ørum & Thomas Rademacker

    Closing plenary

    • Interactive session on Sylus – Staphane Mery, Sijmen de Vries, Jeff Skinner & Thomas Rademacker

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2003, Copenhagen

    Best practices in transfer of science and technology

    SUMMARY

    The fourth annual conference, themed “Best practices in transfer of science and technology”, took place on 22 & 23 May 2003 in Copenhagen, Denmark.

    Plenary sessions were led by experienced speakers from Europe as well as the US and covered a wide range of subjects.

    Experts from the legal, financial and techtransfer world, (past) Presidents of AUTM and eminent scientist shared their experiences on most recent developments and everyday problems in university-industry technology transfer, from licensing and how to manage a TTO, to legal and financial aspects.

    Key topics of this event were:

    • Legal aspects and EU rules
    • Technology Transfer Trends in the US
    • Several sessions on Licensing issues
    • Invention and Inventors
    • Managing a Technology Transfer Office
    • Dynamics in Innovation
    • Legal Framework for science based Start-Ups
    • Setting up Agreements
    • Dealing with Equity
    • Intellectual Property Rights
    • Industry/University Collaborations

    We selected the city of Copenhagen, one of the world’s greatest design capitals; a status that is reflected in its dynamic new buildings, stunning shops and museums. Here, modern architecture and design coexists with historic buildings, ancient streets and the unique enchanting Tivoli Gardens. This combination of history, recent trends and future developments offered a perfect atmosphere for our conference and social program.

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • Contribution of Technology Transfer to an innovative European Economy – Marc Verlinden
    • Tech Transfer Trends in the US – Patricia Harsche

    First parallel session

    • Recent Court Decisions with impact on licensing – Michael Struys
    • The impact of European competition rules on your license and R&D agreements – Kim G. Hansen
    • Legal aspects of licensing – Heinz Goddar
    • Fundamentals about licensing agreements – Patricia Harsche

    Second parallel session

    • Optimizing Cooperation with Scientific inventors – Danielle Berneman & Hendrik Wichmann
    • Coping with Licensing to industry – Louis Berneman & Johannes Linde

    Morning plenary

    • Dynamics in innovation – James M. Utterback

    Third parallel session

    • Practical experiences in starting life sciences companies – Bernard Witholt
    • Legal issues facing start-up companies – Mark R. Hawes
    • Setting up Technology Transfer agreements – Kathleen Denis & Martin Raditsch

    Fourth parallel session

    • Management of Equity portfolio’s – Michael Gera
    • Dealing with acquisitions, winding-up and bankruptcy of your start-up company – John Willkinson
    • IPR in BioTechnology – Bart Claes
    • IPR in Information Technology – Anu Häkli

    Closing plenary

    • Industry/University Collaborations: Different angles and how to close the circle – Johannes Linde
    • Forum discussion – Kathleen Denis, Louis Berneman, Jeff Skinner & Rudy Dekeyser

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2002, Prague

    Best practices in transfer of science and technology

    SUMMARY

    The third annual conference took place on 30 & 31 May 2002 in Prague, Czech Republic, again themed “Best practices in transfer of science and technology”.

    Many experts, whether from the science base, industry, legal, financial or intermediary roles, were present to enrich discussions on the daily conduct of technology transfer. Sessions were concerned with, for example, the results of the new survey on technology transfer and global partnerships for universities.

    New survey data on technology transfer was presented, with its insights into its impact on regional and national economies and on policy making. To enhance the complex process of assembling and analyzing these refractory facts and figures, ASTP started to co-operate with the OECD, which had initiated a study on the topic earlier in 2002.

    The conference closed with a plenary session on Global Partnerships for Universities, presenting interesting models for IP strategies in an open forum discussion.

    We selected the beautiful city of Prague, situated in the heart of Europe, expressing our wish to grow along the lines of the extension of the European Union. Another reason for choosing Prague was its impressive architecture from centuries and its ambitions in the field of technology transfer.

    PRESENTATIONS

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    Opening plenary

    • Different approaches to surveys on technology transfer – Bénédicte Callan & David Owen

    Licensing

    • Risk adjusted DCF, comparing similar technologies, capturing value at different stages – Ron Johnson & Philip Deville
    • Business models, approaches to identify industrial partners, criteria to select industrial partners, technology brokers, are they useful? – Antonio Martinez
    • Pro’s and con’s, electric brokerage – Jens Damsgaard

    First parallel session

    • Legal issues – Karen Hersey
    • Enhancing the value of a portfolio – Jim Roberts

    Second parallel session

    • Case studies and model clauses – Morag Macdonald
    • Conflict of interest – Nick Winterton

    Morning plenary

    • The role of the University in the innovation process – Koenraad Debackere

    Third parallel session

    • Basic Principles – Simon Barnes
    • Shareholder Agreements: Terms & Conditions – Jeff Skinner & Robert Zegelaar

    Closing plenary

    • New models for global partnerships in research & development – Johan Van Helleputte

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2001, Munich

    Facing the facts

    SUMMARY

    The second annual conference of ASTP took place on 31 May & 1 June 2001 in Munich, Germany.

    The theme of the conference was “Facing the facts”, as it included the presentation of results on the first European Survey of Science-Based Technology Transfer Facts and Figures.

    Hundreds of surveys were sent throughout Europe to collect quantitative insights into the financial and economic impact for the university technology transfer: patents, licenses, start-ups, invention disclosures and contract research to name just a few of the issues queried on the survey. The results were discussed by European speakers as well as comparative examples given by experts from the United States who addressed the problems they have overcome to gain their current knowledge.

    At the heart of the conference were topics of universal importance: the most recent developments coupled with the day to day problems to solve when managing university-industry technology transfer. Sessions were focused on for example:

    • Internal organization
    • Patent law
    • The specific and innovative complexities of strategic alliances
    • The valuation of ICT and biotech technologies.

    Munich was chosen not only for its beauty as a city but for its significant contributions to the technology transfer sector. The European headquarters of the European Patent Office is located here. Additionally, Munich is situated in the heart of the “Bavarian Valley” with its “Inkubator”, which was emerging as a prolific catalyst to innovation in the Biotechnology fields, bringing together the best of science, business and entrepreneurship from the region and beyond.

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • Commercial perspectives for the Science Base in Europe – Sir Dai Rees
    • American Approaches towards Technology Transfer – Terry A. Young
    • Experiences with Technology Transfer in EMBL, a multicultural European research laboratory – Fotis C. Kafatos

    First parallel session

    • ASTP survey: Preliminary findings of the first survey – David Owen
    • Experiences with organising academic facts & figures in the USA and Canada – Lori Pressman
    • The importance of University facts and figures for European innovation policy – Manfred Schiemann

    Second parallel session

    • Perspectives of university seed and VC-funds – Ederyn Williams
    • Can collaboration between R&D centers, VC’s and universities result in an added value – Ludo Deferm
    • Joint university research & exploitation – Rudy Dekeyser
    • Supra-university tech transfer in a private technology transfer office – Bernhard Hertel

    Third parallel session

    • Valuation and value creation of universities technologies – Mike Carr
    • Identification of valuable ICT technologies in universities – Rudolf Haggenmuller
    • European experiences with Bio-technology valuation – Martin Sandford
    • Bio-technology valuation in Israel – Batsheva Elran

    Fourth parallel session

    • Comparisons and differences between on university patenting within Europe – Marie-Christine Janssens
    • The strategic Alliance of pharmaceutical company with a University – Jan Raaijmakers

    Closing plenary

    • The role of the university management in organizing technology transfer – Carlès Sola
    • Positioning of the Technology transfer office: for profit or for the benefit of society – Thomas Gering

    ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2000, Paris

    Best practices in transfer of science and technology

    SUMMARY

    The first annual conference of ASTP took place on 15 & 16 June 2000 in Paris, France.

    The theme of the conference was “Best practices in transfer of science and technology”. The programme included the most recent developments, methods and models for transfer of science and technology.

    The initial plenary sessions discussed the economic and political environment and recent studies and statistics. The other sessions were focused on topics such as:

    • Patenting & licensing
    • University start-up companies
    • Strategic alliances
    • Internet based technology transfer
    • Conditions for venture capital & informal investors
    • University and regional development

    The conference ended with a plenary discussion on how to manage a technology transfer office.

    PRESENTATIONS

    Opening plenary

    • Welcome and introduction of the conference – Rudy Dekeyser
    • New policies and instruments to promote European practice in transfer of science and technology – Hendrik Tent
    • New trends in academic-industry technology transfer, Overview of USA methods – Louis P. Berneman
    • Experiences with Anglo- Saxon & Continental methods for Technology Transfer – Douglas Robertson

    First parallel session

    • Incubator facilities for Academic entrepreneurship – Prof. Mark Ferguson
    • Conditions for bio medical start-ups – Paul van Grevenstein
    • UK Experiences with university based ICT start-ups – Jeffrey Skinner
    • Conditions for ICT start-ups – Louis P. Berneman

    Second parallel session

    • Facilities for internet transactions – Bruce Lehman
    • Universities and Industry alliances – Michael Mulqueen

    Third parallel session

    • Managing a patent portfolio – Taina Saksa
    • Risks in the patenting process – Alison Campbell
    • Venture capital & university technology investment – Jim Martin
    • Business Angles & University technology investment – Jaap Blaak

    Fourth parallel session

    • Market research and marketing technologies – Anne-Catherine Jouanneau
    • Perspectives and bottlenecks for commercialising patents of a public research institute – Pierre Brisson
    • Role taking process of public, private and academic parties – Prof. Dylan Jones-Evans
    • Business development in regional perspective – Prof. Koenraad Debackere

    Closing plenary

    • Models for managing a technology transfer office – Board members of ASTP and representatives of AUTM, UNICO and FIST